Puppy Mill Laws By State

Puppy Mill Laws By State*

Alabama – none

Alaska – none

Arizona – If a kennel has five or more dogs, it must be licensed and pay a $75 fee.  Inspections are mandatory if there are more than 20 dogs.  The regulatory agency is the Board of Supervisors of the County in which the kennel is located.

Arkansas – none

California – A breeder is defined as a person or business that has bred and sold all or part of 3 or more litters or 20 or more dogs during the past year.  Breeders are nor required to be licensed and there are no mandatory inspections.

Colorado – A “Pet animal facility” is defined as any place that keeps pet animals for adoption, breeding, boarding, grooming, handling, selling, sheltering, trading, etc.  These facilities must be licensed and are subject to fees up to $350.  Inspections are conducted every 3 years for low-risk facilities, every 18 months for medium-risk, and every 6 months for high-risk.  They are regulated by the State Agricultural Commission

Connecticut – Kennel owners are required to obtain a license if they breed more than 2 litters of dogs per year.  The fee is $100 for a commercial kennel.  There are no regular inspections required.  The town clerks regulate breeding kennels.

Delaware – Kennels must be licensed and must pay a fee (determined by the number of dogs).  Inspections may be conducted, and the Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control regulates commercial kennels.

Florida – none

Georgia – Kennels must be licensed and have to pay a fee of $25 to $200.  There are mandatory inspections conducted, and they are regulated by the Commissioner of Agriculture.

Hawaii – none

Idaho – none

Illinois – Kennels must be licensed and pay a $25 fee.  Inspections are conducted, and kennels are regulated by the Illinois Department of Agriculture.

Indiana – A “commercial dog breeder” is defined as a person who maintains more than 20 unaltered female dogs that are at least 12 months old.  A “commercial dog broker” is a person who has a Class “B” license under 9 CFR 1.1 and who sells at least 500 dogs per calendar year.  Those who meet the criteria for one of these definitions must be licensed and pay the appropriate fee, but no inspections are conducted.

Iowa – Commercial breeders must be licensed and pay $40.  Inspections are conducted for new facilities and annually upon license renewal.  The regulatory agency is Iowa Department of Agriculture, Animal Welfare Bureau.

Kansas – If a facility is federally-licensed, they only need to follow USDA rules on animal care.  Other kennels must be licensed and pay the appropriate fees.  The Kansas Animal Health Department regulates commercial breeders, and inspections are conducted.

Kentucky – none

Louisiana – Any individual or business that breeds and sells five or more dogs must obtain a kennel license and pay the required fee.  No facility can have more than 75 dogs over the age of 1 year at any time for breeding purposes.  The governing bodies of each municipality regulate facilities, and no inspections are conducted.

Maine – A “breeding kennel” is defined as a location where 5 or more dogs capable of breeding are kept, and offspring are sold or exchanged for value.  These kennels must be licensed and pay a $75 fee.  Inspections are supposed to be conducted; the regulatory agency is the Commissioner of Agriculture, Food and Rural Resources.

Maryland – Kennels are not required to be licensed or pay any fees.  Local law enforcement can conduct an announced inspection for investigation of inhumane treatment of dogs by an authorized director of a humane society, accompanied by a sheriff or deputy sheriff.

Massachusetts – Kennels must be licensed and pay an appropriate fee.  Inspections may be conducted.  The regulatory agency is the Police Commissioner of Boston, or the clerk of other towns.

Michigan – Commercial breeders can obtain a kennel license rather than individual licenses for each dog they own.  Kennels with more than 10 dogs must pay a $25 fee.  New facilities are inspected.  Local authorities regulate these facilities.

Minnesota – none

Mississippi – none

Missouri – Kennels are required to obtain a license and pay a fee from $100 to $500.  Facilities are inspected when they are first licensed and once per year after that.  The regulatory agency is the Animal Welfare Official / State Veterinarian.

Montana – none

Nebraska – Commercial breeders must be licensed and pay the appropriate fees.  Facilities are inspected when they are new and then at least once every 2 years.  The regulatory agency is the State Veterinarian of Bureau of Animal Industry of the Department of Agriculture.

Nevada – none

New Hampshire – Commercial kennels must be licensed and pay a $200 fee.  Facilities are inspected when they are new and again at least every 6 months.  The regulatory agency is the Department of Agriculture, Markets, and Food.

New Jersey – Kennels must be licensed and pay the appropriate fees.  Licenses are issued by the municipality where the kennel is located.  Inspections may be conducted.  The regulatory agency is the State Department of Health & Senior Services or local board of health.

New Mexico – none

New York – A “pet dealer” is defined as any person or business that sells more than 9 animals per year for profit to the public.  Pet dealers must obtain a license and pay a $100 fee.  They are subjected to annual inspections.  The regulatory agency is the Commissioner of Agriculture and Markets.

North Carolina – Commercial breeders must be licensed and pay a $50 fee.  Regular inspections are not conducted.  The regulatory agency is the Animal Health Division of the North Carolina Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services.

North Dakota – none

Ohio – Kennels are required to register for a  license and pay a $10 fee.  There are no regular inspections, and the County Auditors regulate the facilities.

Oklahoma – none

Oregon – none

Pennsylvania – Kennels must obtain a license and pay the appropriate fees.  Facilities are inspected when they are new and at least once per year thereafter.  The Department of Agriculture regulates the facilities.

Rhode Island – A “Dealer” is defined as anyone who breeds dogs for the purpose of selling them.  Dealers are required to get a license and pay a $100 fee.  There are no regular inspections.  The Environmental Management Office regulates the facilities.

South Carolina – none

South Dakota – none

Tennessee – Commercial breeders must obtain a license and pay the appropriate fees.  Facilities are inspected when they are new and upon renewal or complaint.  The regulatory agency is the Department of Health.

Texas – none

Utah – none

Vermont – Breeders must obtain a license and pay a $10 fee.  Inspections may be conducted.  The regulatory agency is the Secretary of Agriculture, Food and Markets, Division of Food Safety and Consumer Protection, and municipal clerks.

Virginia – Commercial dog breeders must have a valid business license issued by the locality where the dogs are maintained.  The fees are no more than $50 and are determined by individual counties, cities, or towns.  Inspections are completed at least twice annually and any time there is a complaint.  The regulatory agency is the State Veterinarian for the Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, or any animal control officer, or any public health or safety official.

Washington – none

West Virginia – Commercial breeders must register and pay a $10 fee.  No regular inspections are conducted; the Assessor of each County regulates the facilities.

Wisconsin – none

Wyoming – none

*Some laws and regulations may have changed since this information was gathered.

One Comment

  1. Posted August 3, 2011 at 2:33 pm | Permalink

    Wisconsin DOES now have puppy mill legislation – it became effective in May 2011….

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